Majors and Courses

3-2 Engineering (Scripps)

Engineering is a 3-2 program in which the student spends three years at Scripps and two years at the engineering school to which she transfers, completing a bachelor's degree at Scripps and a second one at the engineering school. Both degrees are awarded at the end of five years upon completion of all requirements. An engineering major planning a 3-2 program must petition for participation in the program to the Committee on Academic Review during the fall semester of her junior year. Please refer to the Combined Degree Programs section of the Scripps catalog.

While she attends Scripps, the student satisfies all requirements for the Scripps degree including the first portion of her engineering major:

  1. Mathematics 30, 31, 32 and Differential Equations (SC Math 102, CMC Math 111, HMC Math 82, or PO Math 102);
  2. Physics 33L, 34L, and 35;
  3. Chemistry 14L;
  4. Two advanced physics course (normally 101, 106 or 107); and
  5. Computer Science 51 or Physics 108.

Keck Science Common Learning Outcomes

Students completing a major in the Keck Science Department should demonstrate the ability to:

1. Use foundational principles to analyze problems in nature.
2. Develop hypotheses and test them using quantitative techniques.
3. Articulate applications of science in the modern world.
4. Effectively communicate scientific concepts both verbally and in writing.

Student Learning Outcomes
When confronted with an unfamiliar physical system, our students should be able to:

  • 1. Develop a framework for understanding the system by identifying the key physical principles underlying the system;
  • 2. Translate the conceptual framework into an appropriate mathematical format;
  • 3.  (a) If the equations are analytically tractable, carry out the analysis of the problem to completion;
    (b) If equations are not tractable, develop a computer code and/or use standard software to numerically simulate the model system.
  • 4. Analyze and assess the reasonableness of the answers obtained;
  • 5. Communicate their findings either verbally and/or via written expression.

In a laboratory setting, students should be able to:

  • 1. Demonstrate a working familiarity with standard laboratory equipment;
  • 2. Identify and appropriately address the sources of error in their experiment;
  • 3. Have proficiency with standard methods of data analysis.